The Denver Nuggets guard and his trainer, Steve Hess, prepared for the NBA season with the aid of the Masimo MightySat™.

Denver Nuggets’ shooting guard Gary Harris is flying through the air with the greatest of ease ten games into the nascent NBA campaign that tipped off last month. The five-year pro who led his team in points per game average (18.9) through the first nine games and is second in steals is one reason why the Nuggets are 9-1 and undefeated at home. As he has done since he became a first-round draft pick from Michigan State, Harris spent the offseason training under the watchful eye of Steve Hess whose bag of tricks includes the Masimo MightySat pulse oximeter.

Hess, who serves as the chief performance operator for Panorama Orthopedic and Spine Center and operating owner of the Panorama Wellness and Sports Institute, introduced Harris to the MightySat during a summer workout last year to instantly monitor oxygen saturation, blood perfusion and get an indication of hydration via the device’s pleth variability index reading. The 24-year-old baller immediately embraced the accurate, hospital-grade technology that also measures pulse and respiration rates.

“It is important to understand that as I evolve as a player, I have to upgrade the performance of my body. It’s not always about working harder; it’s about working smarter! The MightySat gives me the information I need to work smarter in order to create a bigger, faster and more durable me,” said Harris, a 6’4”, 210-pound starter.

Harris’s offseason included off trail bike rides through the thin mountain air of Red Rocks and Manitou Springs in Colorado as well as some high intensity training sessions that Hess kept tabs on via the MightySat. As the start of training camp approached, Hess assigned Harris more sport-specific workouts.

“Our goal was for Gary to come into camp strong, stable and injury free. We wanted to make sure that he didn’t have any nagging injuries, so we gave his body time to recover and guided his workouts accordingly. Our goal was for Gary to arrive in the best shape as he possibly can be in, but not peak form,” said Hess who spent 21 years as the director of performance for the Nuggets.

Hess monitors Harris’s oxygen saturation as part of his process of gathering the best data on a particular individual. He also uses MightySat with the professional baseball, soccer and MMA athletes that he trains.

“MightySat helps me monitor the parameters specific to each individual’s performance profile. In Gary’s case, by controlling the variables, it allows me to keep tabs on how he responds to specific intensities. My role is to design the best, most educated workouts and I do that by controlling the variables – specific variables to see how they correlate to the data we gather on the MightySat. It is a great, highly-important tool used to help plan a course of action.”

The South African-born Hess uses the data from MightySat to help gage his own hydration and monitor strength of blood flow as part of his preparation as an amateur competitive bodybuilder. Professionally, his case load spans pro athletes, surgical cases and corporate CEOs. “It’s easy to use and I integrate the MightySat into every athlete that I see.”

Harris is the first NBA player to use MightySat. He is part of a growing list of world champions, Olympians and professional athletes throughout the sports world who rely on the data generated by the noninvasive fingertip device. Utilizing the best available technology to reliably measure and gather key data not available on other health and wellness devices, MightySat is for use by anyone who wants to improve their health, wellness or fitness. The data generated by the MightySat and collected by the Masimo Personal Health app can be used to help measure cardiovascular fitness, exertion levels and speed of recovery, the latter of which is made simple with the use of the Heart Rate Recovery calculator, an exclusive feature on the Masimo Personal Health app. The data from MightySat may indicate changes in hydration, breathing, fatigue and stress levels as well as changes caused by altitude, a factor for the mile high-based Harris and Hess.

For more information, please visit www.MasimoPersonalHealth.com.